As the Coronavirus has encapsulated the world, government go-aheads to construction firms are welcome relief to the industry. Lenders’ collective reaction to the current economic concerns is another matter. Future financing is always imperative to ensure ongoing construction as well as new projects.

Government responses are changing by the day, but the Federal Reserve (the Fed) has acted decisively and thoroughly in response to the economic threats following the Coronavirus outbreak. Staying true to its Congressional mandate to “promote maximum employment and stable prices, along with its responsibilities to promote the stability of the financial system,” the Fed has devised numerous strategies to meet the persistent demand for redemptions and infuse money into the market. It has cut interest rates to zero, coordinated with other central banks to encourage purchases of the U.S. dollar, committed to purchasing an unlimited amount of U.S. Treasury’s and mortgage-backed securities, and explicitly encouraged banks to reduce their reserves held against demand deposits (by eliminating entirely reserve requirements).
Continue Reading The Federal Reserve’s Powers to Pave the Way for Continued Development and Construction Through COVID-19

As the Coronavirus spreads across the globe, its impact continues to disrupt many industries, including construction.  Over the last twenty years, the construction industry in the United States has substantially increased its reliance on China as a supplier for all types of construction materials including electrical and lighting equipment, elevators and component parts, plumbing fittings

In recent months, Robinson+Cole’s construction lawyers have worked across the country on many significant and unique projects worth billions of dollars in construction value. Our clients are owners, designers, and contractors, and we advised them on all aspects of these projects, from the earliest stages of project delivery selection to the ribbon cutting. This work

On October 24, 2016, the U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Texas preliminarily enjoined the majority of the Department of Labor’s Final Rule implementing President Barack Obama’s Executive Order 13673 that imposed reporting requirements of specified labor law violations on federal government contractors and subcontractors.

The Executive Order provided that contractors and subcontractors for federal

After a public comment period ending this past August, the Connecticut Codes and Standards Committee voted to accept the proposed 2016 State Building Code and 2016 State Fire Safety Code. The new code replaces the 2005 State Building Code, and its amendments, and will apply to all permit applications made on or after October 1, 2016. The 2016 Code incorporates several national model codes, along with Connecticut-specific amendments, including:

  • 2012 International Building Code
  • 2009 ICC/ANSI A117.1 Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities Code
  • 2012 International Existing Building Code
  • 2012 International Plumbing Code
  • 2012 International Mechanical Code
  • 2012 International Energy Conservation Code
  • 2014 NFPA 70 National Electric Code
  • 2012 International Residential Code

Connecticut’s amendments to the various model codes, as published by the Office of the State Building Inspector, can be found here.


Continue Reading Connecticut Finally Adopts New Building Code Effective October 1, 2016

Pearl Jam CoverIn November 1989, I was a second year law student interviewing with firms in Connecticut and New York for a summer associate position.  During the Thanksgiving Holiday, I scheduled an interview with a small firm in New Haven.  The firm’s primary area of practice was construction litigation. I had no idea what “construction litigation” entailed,

A post about a remarkable technological leap in the construction industry would hardly be news. The advances we’ve witnessed over the last few decades have been (and continue to be) revolutionary. But some steps ‘forward’ serve as reminders that critical sectors of the industry have a long way to go.

Connecticut recently adopted revised regulations

The Common Interest Privilege May Offer More Protection Than You Thought.

Consider for a moment a situation when an Owner and a General Contractor want to exchange confidential communications relating to a potential legal matter. When the Owner and Contractor are not both parties in a suit, what protections might they have?

One possible consideration